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Sommaires des Revues - Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery

SFN : Last 10 articles


Last 10 articles published in Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery


Body Weight Changes after Deep Brain Stimulation for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder or Depression  Voir?

Background: In 2010, we published an often-cited case report describing smoking cessation and substantial weight loss after deep brain stimulation (DBS) for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in an obese patient. To test whether this single observation was also observed in the treated population at large, the weight changes of a larger cohort of patients who underwent DBS for OCD or major depressive disorder (MDD) were studied. Results: Data were available for 46 patients (30 OCD and 16 MDD patients; mean age 46.2 years, SD 10.9) with an average baseline body mass index (BMI) of 28.0 (SD 7.3), 26 of whom (57%) were overweight (n = 11), obese (n = 12), or morbidly obese (n = 3). Mean follow-up was 3.8 years (range 10 months to 8.7 years, SD 2.3), after which the average BMI was 28.1 (SD 7.0), not significantly different from baseline. The average BMI of the 15 patients with (morbid) obesity at baseline decreased from 36.8 to 34.6 (ns), while the average BMI of the 31 normal or “only” overweight patients at baseline increased from 23.8 to 25.0 (ns). Conclusion: There was no significant change in body weight on group level after DBS for either OCD or MDD.
Stereotact Funct Neurosurg 2017;95:348-351

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Impact of the Number of Metastatic Tumors Treated by Stereotactic Radiosurgery on the Dose to Normal Brain: Implications for Brain Protection  Voir?

Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the number of brain lesions for which stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) was performed on the dose volume relationships in normal brain. Materials and Methods: Brain tissue was segmented using the patient's pre-SRS MRI. For each plan, the following data points were recorded: total brain volume, number of lesions treated, volume of brain receiving 8 Gy (V8), V10, V12, and V15. Results: A total of 225 Gamma Knife® treatments were included in this retrospective analysis. The number of lesions treated ranged from 1 to 29. The isodose for prescription ranged from 40 to 95% (mean 55%). The mean prescription dose to tumor edge was 18 Gy. The mean coverage, selectivity, conformity, and gradient index were 97.5%, 0.63, 0.56, and 3.5, respectively. The mean V12 was 9.5 cm3 (ranging from 0.5 to 59.29). There was no correlation between the number of lesions and brain V8, V12, V10, or V15. There was a direct and statistically significant relationship between the brain volume treated (V8, V10, V12, and V15) and total volume of tumors treated (p < 0.001). In our study, the integral dose to the brain exceeded 3 J when the total tumor volume exceeded 25 cm3. Conclusions: The number of metastatic brain lesions treated bears no significant relationship to total brain tissue volume treated when using SRS. The fact that the integral dose to the brain exceeded 3 J when the total tumor volume exceeded 25 cm3 is useful for establishing guidelines. Although standard practice has favored using whole brain radiation therapy in patients with more than 4 lesions, a significant amount of normal brain tissue may be spared by treating these patients with SRS. SRS should be carefully considered in patients with multiple brain lesions, with the emphasis on total brain volume involved rather than the number of lesions to be treated.
Stereotact Funct Neurosurg 2017;95:352-358

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Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring (Motor and Somatosensory Evoked Potentials) in Dorsal Root Entry Zone Lesioning for Brachial Plexus Avulsion Pain  Voir?

Aims: To address the feasibility and importance of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) in dorsal root entry zone (DREZ) lesioning for brachial plexus avulsion pain. Methods: Muscle motor evoked potential (mMEP) and somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) were applied during DREZ lesioning for brachial plexus avulsion pain. Results: IONM of mMEPs and SSEPs was feasible for monitoring of the spinal cord during DREZ lesioning. With the exception of 3 unrecordable mMEPs in ipsilateral arms, mMEPs were preserved and referenced to look for changes according to lesioning in 6 upper extremities (66.6%) and 8 lower extremities. All 3 patients with >50% reduction in baseline mMEP amplitude after lesioning in either the ipsilateral upper or lower extremities showed postoperative ataxia and weakness of the lower extremities (100%). Only 2 out of 9 patients (22.2%) with brachial plexus avulsion pain had discernible baseline SSEPs in the ipsilateral upper extremities. One of 2 patients with discernible SSEPs in the upper extremities showed significant SSEP events during the DREZ lesioning and experienced postoperative ataxia and weakness in the legs despite the absence of a SSEP event in the lower extremities. Conclusion: Significant events on IONM were common during DREZ lesioning for brachial plexus avulsion pain and were closely related to the occurrence of postoperative neurological deficits.
Stereotact Funct Neurosurg 2017;95:330-340

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The Relationship of Electrophysiologic Subthalamic Nucleus Length as a Predictor of Outcomes in Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson Disease  Voir?

Background: Intraoperative measurement of subthalamic nucleus (STN) width through microelectrode recording (MER) is a common proxy for optimal electrode location during deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery for Parkinson disease. We assessed whether the MER-determined STN width is a predictor of postoperative Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) improvement. Methods: Records were reviewed for patients who underwent single-sided STN DBS placement for Parkinson disease between 2005 and 2010 at the UAB Medical Center. Reviews of preoperative and 3-month postoperative UPDRS part III, intraoperative MER records, and postoperative MRI scans were conducted. Results: The final cohort consisted of 73 patients (mean age 59 ± 9.7 years, length of disease 13 ± 9.7 years). STN widths were defined as depths associated with increased background activity and motor-driven, spiking action potentials on MER. The mean contralateral UPDRS improvement was 58% (± 24). The mean STN width was 5.1 mm (± 1.6, min = 0.0, max = 8.7). No significant relationship between STN width and UPDRS improvement was found, with and without AC-PC normalization (R2 < 0.05). Conclusion: This analysis raises questions about seeking the maximal electrophysiological width of STN as a proxy for optimal outcome in DBS for PD. We suggest this strategy for DBS placement in Parkinson disease be subject to more robust prospective investigation.
Stereotact Funct Neurosurg 2017;95:341-347

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Infection and Erosion Rates in Trials of a Cranially Implanted Neurostimulator Do Not Increase with Subsequent Neurostimulator Placements  Voir?

Background/Aims: The RNS® System utilizes a cranially implanted neurostimulator attached to leads placed at the seizure focus to provide brain responsive stimulation for the treatment of medically intractable partial onset epilepsy. Infection and erosion rates related to the cranial implant site were assessed overall and by neurostimulator procedure to determine whether rates increased with additional procedures. Methods: Infection and erosion rates were calculated as (1) chance per neurostimulator procedure, (2) incidence per patient implant year, and (3) rates for initial and each subsequent neurostimulator implant (generalized estimating equation). Results: In 256 patients followed for an average of 7 years, the infection rate was 3.7% per neurostimulator procedure (n = 31/840), and the rate of erosions was 0.8% per neurostimulator procedure (n = 7/840). Rates did not increase with subsequent neurostimulator procedures (p = 0.66, infection; p = 0.70, erosion). A prior infection or erosion at the implant site did not significantly increase the risk at a later procedure (p ≥ 0.05 for all combinations). Conclusion: These data indicate that the risk for infection compares favorably to other neurostimulation devices and suggest that rates of infection and erosion do not increase with subsequent neurostimulator replacements.
Stereotact Funct Neurosurg 2017;95:325-329

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WSSFN Society News  Voir?


Stereotact Funct Neurosurg 2017;95:287
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ASSFN Society News  Voir?


Stereotact Funct Neurosurg 2017;95:288
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ESSFN Mission  Voir?


Stereotact Funct Neurosurg 2017;95:289
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Hemorrhage Detection and Incidence during Magnetic Resonance-Guided Deep Brain Stimulator Implantations  Voir?

Background/Aims: Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) is increasingly used to implant deep brain stimulator (DBS) electrodes. The approach has the advantages of a high targeting accuracy, minimization of brain penetrations, and allowance of implantation under general anesthesia. The hemorrhagic complications of iMRI-guided DBS implantation have not been studied in a large series. We report on the incidence and characteristics of hemorrhage during these procedures. Methods: Hemorrhage incidence was assessed in a series of 231 iMRI procedures (374 electrodes implanted). All patients had movement disorders and the subthalamic nucleus or the globus pallidus internus was typically targeted. Hemorrhage was detected with intra- or postoperative MRI or postoperative computed tomography. Hemorrhage was classified based on its point of origin and clinical impact. Results: Hemorrhage and symptomatic hemorrhage were detected during 2.4 and 1.1% of electrode implantations, respectively. The hemorrhage origin was subdural/subarachnoid (n = 3), subcortical (n = 5), or deep (n = 1). Factors that contributed to hemorrhage included unintentional crossing of a sulcus and resistance at the pial membrane, which produced cortical depression and a rebound hemorrhage. Delayed hemorrhage occurred in 2 patients and was attributed to premature reintroduction of anticoagulation therapy or air intrusion into the cranial cavity. Conclusions: Hemorrhage was readily apparent on intraoperative imaging, and hemorrhage rates for iMRI-guided DBS implantations were comparable to those for conventional implantation approaches.
Stereotact Funct Neurosurg 2017;95:307-314

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Factors Affecting Stereotactic Accuracy in Image-Guided Deep Brain Stimulator Electrode Placement  Voir?

Background/Aims: Intraoperative imaging allows near-real-time assessment of stereotactic accuracy during implantation of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. Such technology can be used to examine factors impacting stereotactic error. Methods: Intraoperative CT imaging was reviewed in patients undergoing DBS placement at Oregon Health and Sciences University. Coordinates of the target electrode were compared to the operative plan to characterize the magnitude and direction of stereotactic error with respect to side of implantation, target, and electrode approach angles. Results: One hundred sixty-nine leads in 94 patients were examined. Targets were GPi (n = 86), STN (n = 31), and Vim (n = 52). The average Euclidean error was 1.63 mm (SD 0.87). The error magnitude was higher for Vim (1.95 mm) than for GPi (1.44 mm), while STN (1.65 mm) did not differ from either Vim or GPi (ANOVA: F = 6.15, p = 0.003). Electrodes targeting Vim and STN were significantly more likely to deviate medially compared to those targeting GPi (ANOVA: F = 9.13, p < 0.001). The coronal approach angle affected the error when targeting Vim (#x03C1; = 0.338, p = 0.01). These findings were confirmed during multivariate analyses. Conclusions: This study shows a significant effect of target on the accuracy of electrode placement for DBS. Targeting Vim results in a greater Euclidean error and a greater medial deviation off target. These systematic deviations should be taken into account during electrode implantation.
Stereotact Funct Neurosurg 2017;95:315-324

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Dernière mise à jour : 17/10/2017 : 03:10


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